3.10.13

TODAY'S QUIZ: One Degree of Separation


This is Nathaniel Sparhawk, wealthy merchant of Kittery Maine,  son-in-law of Sir William Pepperell, the only American baronet, as painted by John Singleton Copley in 1764 (Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).


This is a scene from 'Lost Boundaries', starring Mel Ferrer and Beatrice Pearson, which won the award for Best Screenplay at the 1949 Cannes Film Festival.


And these are children of Frederick Woolworth, of those Woolworths, at the former family summer home in Monmouth, Maine, as featured in the August, 2012 issue of Town & Country (photograph by Susanna Howe)


And last, Darryl Hall of Hall & Oates, at his house in Maine (photo via Zimbio)



Do you know the thread that connects these disparate people across the centuries?  No fair using Google if you don't know the answer.

I connect the dots in the October issue of Portland Monthly, beginning on Page 25.  Click HERE for the article.

P.S.  Early on in the article, I use the word bravado.  I meant bravura.  Really I did.  Unfortunately, if I spell my mistake correctly, spell check can't save me from myself...

9 comments:

Hels said...

No, I don't know the answer.

But the son of the American baronet, painted by John Singleton Copley in 1764, looked as if he was on the Grand Tour of Italy. Complete with ancient Roman ruins!

Pompeo Batoni wasn't the only portrait artist to be commissioned!

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

http://wikimapia.org/#lang=en&lat=44.257556&lon=-69.952440&z=14&m=b&show=/12845623/Norman-Woolworth-s-Clearview-Stables-Farm&search=woolworth

Anonymous said...

As usual, fascinating, beautifully written, perfectly paced so, while waiting for the 3rd page of your article to load, just dropping by to say Well Done!

-Flo

penelopebianchi said...

Wonderful post! Fascinating!

and beautifully written!

Anonymous said...

Those Woolworths barely had any of the fortune to begin with, so it's no surprise they eventually petered out. The McCanns, Donohues, poor Barbara Hutton, and the Knoxes got the lion's share.

Anonymous said...

I have been searching for years for more information on Sparhawk Hall esp. for my book; "Lost Landmarks of York County" I can't believe you found all this! I'm so pleased to finally know the fate of this historic home, and that rooms still exist. If the Mitchells had only sold the home when they ran into financial problems it might still stand today. Wonderful article, again thank you!

La Petite Gallery said...

wonderful post. Didn't know teh woolworths had a home in Maine.
yvonne

Catherine said...

A fun game of connect the dots, and very evocative of old Maine -- and even older Maine. The columns in Copley's painting, though, are pure fantasy. As impressive as Sparhawk Hall is, there were nothing that Baroque or monumental in 18th c. Maine. (Copley also fudged the buttons on Sparhawk's coat. If you look more closely, you can see he went back & made him fatter, in keeping with his high status. No Thom Browne for those guys!)

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